Reasons to make this fudge: Because I don't celebrate Christmas. Because I love candy. Because I am Québécoise. Because this is my favorite thing in the world to eat. Because I've never made it before. Because I like to be challenged. Because edible gifts are the best kind of gifts. Because I have a new thermometer. 

Because I wanted to. 

Just because. 

This fudge is a traditional Quebecois recipe that I've been wanting to attempt for quite some time. Unfortunately, I've always been intimidated by any recipe that calls for a thermometer, as I've had a few caramel disasters in the past. (Caramel melting the bowl to the bottom of the microwave, caramel burning to the pot, caramel burning my hand, caramel burning my tongue, caramel burning...) 

Leaving the past in the past, I now feel confident enough in the kitchen to consider myself somewhere between novice and expert, and definitely ready for a challenge. And when my challenge is presented in a way that makes it look easy, well I just have to take it on.

Just before slipping into a food coma from all of my holiday indulgences, I watched as Chuck Hughes came on television and demonstrated just how simple this traditional fudge is to make. Texting myself the ingredients as I listened (because, you know, paper and pens are sooo 2005), I knew I had to rush home and make this stuff. As soon as humanly possible. 
And then again a second time. 
You know, for gifts. 

Traditional Sucre-a-la-Creme 
(French Canadian Maple Fudge)
recipe adapted from the Food Network's Chuck Hughes

note: the original recipe calls for one tbsp of butter. I found my fudge to be a little on the greasy side and believe that it should be done with less. I also omitted the pecans, as I wanted a more traditional variety. 

what you'll need
1 ½ cups brown sugar
1 cup 35% cream
½ cup sugar
½  cup maple syrup
½  tsp butter
Pinch sea salt

how to do it
Line an 8'' x 8''square pan with plastic wrap and lightly oil.
In a saucepan, combine the brown sugar, cream, sugar, maple syrup, butter and salt and bring to a boil, stirring with a heatproof spatula. Simmer over medium heat until a candy thermometer reads 237 degrees F (114 degrees C). Add the vanilla extract without stirring.
Prepare a bowl large enough to fit the saucepan into. Fill with cold water and ice.
Once the candy reaches 237 degrees, place the pan immediately into a cold water bath. Cool, without stirring, until the thermometer reads 113 degrees F (45 degrees C), about 15 to 20 minutes.
Remove the pan from the water bath. Using an electric mixer or a wooden spoon, stir vigorously until the mixture begins to lighten in color and become creamy, 2 to 3 minutes. Do not over-whip, as the sugar and cream mixture will harden before you have time to pour it into the pan.







Mouth watering. Impressive. Unbelievably simple. Creamy. Refreshing. Amazing. 
Need more adjectives? Try out the recipe and come up with your own! Thanks to Lisa over at Bites of Sweetness for her inspiration. 

Vanilla Pots-de-Creme
with Brown Sugar Caramel

what you'll need
1 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup whole or 2% milk
6 large egg yolks
1/4 cup honey
1 tbsp vanilla extract
seeds from one vanilla bean (optional, but worth it)

1/3 cup brown sugar
6 tbsp water

 how to do it
In a medium saucepan, bring the milk and cream to a simmer. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks, honey and vanilla until thickened. Slowly pour the warm cream into the yolks while whisking to temper the yolks. Continue pouring a little at a time until well blended, then transfer to a large measuring cup.
Evenly pour the mixture into ramekins, place in a deep roasting pan and fill the pan half way up the sides of the ramekins with water. Bake for 30-35 minutes until they are only a little wobbly (only one or two ripples when you shake the pan.)
Leave to cool in pan, then remove ramekins and refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving. If refrigerating longer, allow to fully cool and then cover with plastic wrap.

Caramel sauce: Heat brown sugar and water in small saucepan over medium heat until mixture begins to bubble. Stir often with a heatproof spatula until desired consistency is reached. Pour over cooled pots-de-creme and serve. 

what you'll need
1 large sweet potato, about 1.5 cups, cubed
1 tsp coarse ground sea salt
1 tsp coarse ground peppercorns
1 tbsp ground sumac
1 tbsp grapeseed or light olive oil

how to do it
Preheat oven to 400F. Toss sweet potato cubes with oil and spices. Wrap in parchment paper (papillote/envelope style) and place in baking dish. Bake for 45 minutes.  Remove from oven, let cool about 15 minutes before serving. 








This year, I had the most wonderful opportunity to participate in the 2nd annual Great Food Blogger Cookie Swap. I was the lucky recipient of a box of absolutely addictive cinnamon swirl cookies from Dana over at Hot Pink Apron. I also received 2 boxes of chocolate chip "World Peace" cookies (from two different bloggers, and one huge coincidence!) IF YOU SENT THESE TO ME, PLEASE CONTACT ME! I'd like to link to you on my blog, and I've somehow lost the folder that I had put your letters/contact info into! 

So when this whole swap started, I felt as though the pressure was on for me - make something amazing that I haven't yet blogged? Generally, if I've made something amazing in the past, it's been blogged in a Montreal Minute. Except for one thing - my Cinnadoodles! Vanilla-almond cookies coated in cinnamon sugar. You read that correctly. Vanilla. Almond. Cinnamon. Go ahead, wipe the drool off your chin. This is some seriously good stuff. The main reason that I haven't yet blogged these addictive little buggers is simply 'cause they haven't lasted more than 24 hours in my apartment! I actually had to package and hide the boxes that I was sending away in fear that they'd be gobbled up before I awoke the next morning. 

A little note that I discovered while baking for the challenge: this recipe does NOT multiply well. I've made it countless times, and it's always worked for me, but the first attempt at tripling it, was the biggest baking flop I've had in a long time. So please, go and make these, they are delicious and cute and perfect with tea or all on their own. But don't alter the measurements. (Oh, but if you must, triple all of the ingredients, except the flour - use 2.25 cups.)

Oh, and did I mention how they're oh-so-seasonally appropriate with their super sparkly crispy outsides and ooey gooey almondy insides? Well they are. Which also makes them the perfect gift. I truly hope that my three recipients appreciated them as much as I enjoyed mine!

Cheese - it's my biggest weakness. Cheese is the reason I haven't been able to stay on vegan wagon. Cheese is also the reason that I look forward to coming home after work. There's something so comforting about letting a nice piece of aged cheddar melt on my tongue. Have you ever tasted a dish and thought to yourself "Mm, this is good, but it could use a little something!" HOLD THAT SALT SHAKER! I've seen so many people just salt up their bland dishes. You're doing it wrong. My friends, cheese is often the answer to those blah-dish-woes.


Feta cheese in particular has a special place in my heart - growing up, my mother often made Greek-style salads to go along with our summer meals - the saltiness created a perfect balance with the acidic tomatoes and the refreshing cucumbers. Unfortunately, feta has always been salad-zoned in my kitchen. I've always found that the salt and the strong taste often overpower other flavours, so I've shyed away from using it in anything other than, well, a salad!

And then, this recipe came to me in the most recent issue of Canadian Living: curried spinach and kale hand pies with feta. An interesting combination, I thought, so I tried them out - omitting the turmeric and replacing it with cinnamon.  My, oh my, what a pie! Unfortunately, I miscalculated the amount of greens mixture that I needed for the filling, and found myself with a pretty substantial bowl of spinach and cheese mixture that I couldn't bear to toss. So I kept it, thinking the leftovers would inspire me. And that, they did! I stacked them on top of a bowl of plain couscous that I was keeping for a quick snack/dinner and when I opened my fridge this evening, the combination seemed perfect!

This is a hearty meal, perfect for the type of weather we've been seeing here lately - oh, and for those of you not in Montreal, just picture the most disgusting wintery mix of slush and sleet and ice and everything cold and wet that you can muster, and you've got a pretty accurate representation of our outdoor conditions. So here, I present to you, Couscous with Kale and Feta.



Alright, let's be real...

You usually don't read past the 3rd line of my blogs before you skip down to the recipe.

You know what? That's ok! You're still a loyal reader, and you're interested in the most important part - my food creations! So today, just for you, I've taken all of the tough work away from you - here you won't find any two-finger sliding, rolling, or clicking arrows in order to get to what matters. You see, it's not that I don't want to ramble on about how amazing squash is, and how you can make so many things with it. (Case in point - my squash cake here!) But, seeing as this is my second blog of the day, I'll just get right down to business.

Just make this soup.
Like now. And then warm it up when you're cold.
And then thank me.
(Oh. You're welcome.)

Squash Soup with Rosemary & Spice
an original recipe by allison sklar

what you'll need
1 medium acorn or butternut squash, PEELED and chopped into 1-inch cubes, seeds removed
2 cups chopped carrots
2 sprigs rosemary
4-5 cups vegetable broth
2 cups water
3 cinnamon sticks
1 tsp cumin powder
1 tsp Sriracha hot sauce
2 tsp ground sea salt
1 tbsp fresh ground peppercorns

how to do it
Combine 1c broth with 2c water, add rosemary and cinnamon. Boil carrots and squash in liquid until very soft, about 20 minutes. Once fully cooked, remove cinnamon sticks. Remove mixture from heat, and, using a hand blender, pulse the mixture until velvety. Return mixture to stovetop on low heat. Slowly add 1c vegetable broth at a time, stirring well between additions. (Use more or less broth depending on desired consistency.) When desired thickness is reached, add cumin, hot sauce, salt and pepper. Stir together. Serve hot, garnished with a dollop of sour cream or yogout and roasted acorn squash seeds (or any other seeds that you can find, as the acorn squash seeds proved to be too delicious to even make it into the photoshoot.)





My name is Allison, and I am an avocadoholic. 

I can't help it; it's all I ever want to eat. I've tried to figure out what it is that draws me to this ridiculously expensive - albeit healthy - habit, and I've come to a handful of possible conclusions. I've thought that perhaps it's my body craving the 20 essential nutrients that avocadoes have to offer. I've also considered the possibility that maybe it's just my body craving healthy fats. Or maybe, just maybe, it's simply because it's something that just tastes so darn good! It's a creamy, delicious, versatile food that can be used as a dip, in a sandwich, or as I've discovered recently, as a sauce.

This lovely creation was actually inspired by a condiment that I quite enjoy at this Venezuelan resto in the plateau (aptly named Arepera Du Plateau - and highly recommended if you're in the Montreal area!) They serve their sandwiches and salads with this bright green addiction-forming avocado-based deliciousness. I've been known to order an avocado and cheese sandwich and slather it in avocado the stuff. (Because, well, I can never have too much avocado!) I don't quite know what's in their sauce, but I've taken my three favorite elements form it (avocadoes, cilantro and spice) and created my own version. I served it atop some egg pasta and garnished it with extra chopped fresh cilantro. The result? Delicious dinner in a flash, and a new way to use my favorite fruit!

I've gone and done it.
I've made the most addictive dessert in the world.

Are you familiar with the crispy perimeter of a home-baked chocolate chip cookie? You know, I'm talking about that little crunchy bit that surrounds the cookie, the part that kinda taste like toffee? Alright, well even if you don't know what I'm going on about, you should know that it's some extremely delicious stuff. So, what if I told you that you can (easily) make this crunchy toffee deliciousness into it's very own thing? Yeah, well you can. And I'm going to show you how!

This dessert is a gigantic winner in my books for a handful of reasons. For one, it's super fast to prepare, and even faster to clean up. Second, this treat satisfies my cookie craving without the whole lengthy rolling-dough-into-balls part of the process. Third, this sweet stuff tastes like heaven! This recipe yields a large quantity but requires little effort, making it a great option for a bakesale, or to give as an edible gift to someone special. 

Disclaimer: this recipe is not recommended for those with weak self-control.

Toffee Cookie Bars
an original recipe, inspired by piece of cake blog

what you'll need
1 cup white sugar
1 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup desiccated coconut (very finely shredded)
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
3 tbsp vanilla extract
1 tbsp coarse ground sea salt
1/2 cup add-ins (chocolate chips or nuts of your choice)

how to do it
Preheat your oven to 350F. (My oven is hardcore, so I heat mine to only 340. Adjust yours as necessary. These burn easily.)

Melt butter with sugar in microwave, for about one minute. Stir until well blended. Mixture should be shiny and smooth. Stir in vanilla and coconut. Slowly stir in flour and salt. Toss with your add-ins.
Pour onto parchment-lined 9x13 cookie sheet and spread out evenly. (The mixture should be spread quite thin, that's the idea!) Bake for 20 minutes, or until top begins to be golden brown.

Remove from oven, and slice into rectangles while still hot - this is important, as once these cool, they are no longer easy to slice!

Let cool completely (this will allow them to harden and become even more delicious!)
Enjoy... over and over and over again.






Pumpkin alfredo sauce, where have you been all of my life?

I came up with this quick and simple dish after flipping through the latest issue of Food Network Magazine. For a couple of weeks, I'd routinely flip back to the same page, drooling over a photo of tortellini bathed in this dreamy pumpkin sauce. The original recipe asked to sautée pumpkin with nutmeg, but since I'm really not a nutmeg kind of gal, I decided to omit that step. I then reassessed the rest of the recipe, and well, I pretty well stripped it down to the basics (pumpkin puree and cream) and then added my own little twist.

My version comes together when delicious pumpkin puree meets with heavy cream, gets sprinkled with a hint of marinated garlic and finished off with a generous sprinkling of parmigiano reggiano cheese. Toss it with pasta and top it all off with sea salt and pepper, and you've got a meal. This sauce is so velvety that it tastes sinful, yet it's surprisingly light thanks to the magic that is pumpkin puree.
(Also, what better way to get a picky eater to eat his or her veggies?!)


This recipe's quick, easy, and ridiculously tasty - so make it tonight! Whether it's for yourself, or to impress a lucky guest, tastebuds everywhere will be rejoicing in the glory of this newfound autumn comfort food.

Note: I served this with fresh cheese ravioli, but it would be a great companion to tortellini, fettuccine, tagliatelle or any other of your favorite pasta varieties.

It's that time of year again, Montreal! You know, that season that isn't quite a season? For those of you who don't live here, let me fill you in. We've had the kind of days that've started off in cozy sweaters and boots, and have ended off in shorts and flip flops. We've seen the kind of weeks that have offered us weather reminiscent of Melbourne - rain, sun, frost and heat all within 24 hours.


One certainty in all of this is that Autumn has officially arrived! The general drop in temps has offered us a much needed break after our wildly humid summer, so we can put our hair down and lace our boots up. Because, let's face it - the best part of fall is the fashion... Oh, and of course, the other best part is the comfort food!

So, without further adieu, I present to you the rich, the tasty, the creamy mushroom risotto! Inspired by a deliciously rich dish that I recently ate at a small resto (in the suburbs, who'd have imagined!?) I decided to create my very own version.

It does take some time to make, but don't let that stop you - it's totally and completely worth it.
Now go get cooking!



Prior to last year, Brussels Sprouts and I had never crossed paths. Perhaps it was because I was brought up thinking that these little green spheres were meant to taste putrid, and that I should avoid them at all costs. (In reality, I think it was just because my mother didn't like them herself.) Whatever the case, I discovered cabbage's baby cousins while on holiday abroad, and I have been eating them happily ever since. 

Lately, I've been hum-ho while cooking (aka, lazy) and eaten most of my veggies straight-up steamed. Tonight however, I decided that it was time to spruce things up. A gander into my fridge led me to throw in a dash of this, a sprinkle of that, and before I knew it, voila! A delightful honey garlic sauce was born.

Summertime cooking tends to pair well with three particular descriptors: light, fresh, and fast. 
With pot-lucks and BBQs-a-plenty, it's sometimes hard to stick to the "light" and "fresh" part of that equation. I've been known to generally bring along my no-fail-crowd-pleasing spinach dip whenever the occasion permits. Today, however, I felt like being a little different - I wanted to bring it up a notch. I decided that I was going to make something healthier, fresher, brighter... 



Leaning further toward the vegan side of life these days, I was inspired to make an egg-free, dairy-free dip. You'd think this would have limited my options, but in fact, it just opened a whole new door into the world of food. Last week, I fell in love with a simple salad that I picked up at the grocery store - edamame beans, cilantro and sesame. A flavour combination that would certainly blend well into a dip, I thought! Well, today was the perfect day to try it out. Gathering all my fresh ingredients, I knew I was ready to wow the crowd. I threw everything into my blender, hit pulse and... watched it fail. My blender just didn't want to whip up something so thick and creamy. What a jerk! Just when I was about to give up, a tiny imaginary lightbulb hovered over my head and lit right up - hand blender to the rescue! The result: Hummus meets Guacamole at a party and they make a delicious baby together. 
Sounds about right. 


Montreal weather patterns seem to live by the catch-phrase "go big or go home." We receive frequent weather warnings, which advise us to keep our pets, small children and elderly indoors. The past few days have come with such warnings - today's was aptly titled "High Heat and Humidity Alert." 
A raunchy 42 degree heat has rendered daily activities much less pleasant - so turning on a stove, or any appliance (other than an air conditionner) is undeniably out of the question. 



Now what's a girl to do when she's invited someone special for dinner under such circumstances? Sweat it out and risk being unpresentable for the sake of good food? Of course not! The answer, my friends, is a no-cook meal. Alas, enter a summertime wonder: gazpacho. Serve alongside a greek style salad and some vegetable rice wraps, and you've got yourself a complete no-cook, vegan, gluten-free, low-prep, fuss-free meal.

And it's refreshingly delicious, to boot!

Happy Summer, Everyone!
I am aware that you don't make friends with salad, however... nobody's ever said that you don't make friends with salad dressing! This dressing, my friends, is heaven in a mason jar. This dressing, my friends, will make even those salad-haters (you know who you are), want to eat salad. This dressing, my friends, could even be used on things other than salad. (OH! THE POSSIBILITIES!).

This dressing is it.





Having gotten myself into the daily habit of coming home to eat organic carrots dipped straight into the tahini jar, proceeding to declare that this indeed consists of an acceptable dinner (because, you know, it's summer, and really, who wants to turn on the oven, or move more muscles than needed?) I've  decided that I should use my newfound love of sesame paste to experiment.

Inspired by the dwindling contents of my fridge, some vegetables that needed to be consumed, and a craving for something nutty, I concocted this sesame-soy-blow-your-mind-baby.
World, I introduce to you the best salad dressing in existence.
Oh yeah, and the salad I made is pretty decent too.


Sweet & Tangy Sesame Dressing 
on Beet & Citrus Salad


what you'll need


salad:
1 cup arugula
1 medium beet, sliced thin
1 tangerine, segments cut in half
2 tbsp hulled sunflower seeds
4 radishes (if desired)

dressing:
1/4 cup tahini
3 tbsp light olive oil
1 tbsp honey
2 tbsp white vinegar
2 tsp soy sauce


how to do it


Combine all salad ingredients. Whisk dressing ingredients all together. Pour about 5 tbsp of dressing over salad, or more, to taste. 






I'd like to take this opportunity to extend my warmest welcome to my most desired season: springtime. While blooming flowers begin to paint the city with their limitless palette and scent the warming air with their intoxicating perfume, while the days get longer and the skirts get shorter, and while the sunshine begins to lend my chalky skin a warm glow, my two favorite elements of springtime are, unsurprisingly, food-related. 



My favorite part of spring? Visiting the outdoor farmers' markets to obtain fresh, local produce, and planting my vegetable & herb garden. (Harvesting my own garden is my favorite part of Summer, but we'll get to that when it happens.) This year, I'm trying something new: a balcony garden. As many of you may have experienced, urban living often comes with the sacrifice of a yard. However, inspired by a friend of mine, I've decided to be more proactive about where my food comes from and have decided that a little lack of terrain will not stop me from relishing the joy of harvesting my own veggies at home! 

As it's the first time I'll be doing this, I'm keeping it quite simple, with an assortment of herbs, some lettuces and, (my favorite) yellow cherry tomatoes. If you have any advice on balcony gardening, I'd love to hear from you! Leave a comment here or on my facebook page. 

Until my garden grows, I'll be getting my fresh produce at the markets, where it seems as though each week something new is in season, which is an encouraging way to consume variety and enjoy fresh flavours at their peak!

A recent pot-luck dinner that I'd attended showcased a delightfully refreshing mango salad, and it inspired me to add some variety to my routine mixed greens. Today, I wandered over to the market, where I was further inspired to throw this fantastical salad together. The following is a recipe that I'm going to be making about one million times this summer. Once you try it, you likely will be repeating it, too. 

The list of ingredients alone are enough to make any foodie drool: Mangoes. Avocadoes. Radishes. Mâche.  An odd combination, perhaps in your mind. But in your mouth, I assure you, it is like no salad that's ever grazed your lips.

Oh, and to top it off, a nutmeg balsamic dressing. 
Yeah. That's right. Nutmeg. 
Crazy you say? 
Delicious, actually. 

Note: if you cannot find mache in your area, it can be replaced with watercress or dandelion greens.


I am generally not a soup person. The idea of having something that's both liquidy and chunky at the same time on my spoon just doesn't jive in my head, nor does it feel right in my mouth. That being said, there have always been a few exceptions: matzah ball soup, for one. And, well, who can resist clam chowdah (...in a bread bowl, in San Francisco, at that?) Otherwise, soup is rarely a headliner, neither a sidekick on my table.

However, today, while staring blankly into my fridge as I often do, I found myself staring at my box of vegetable stock and slightly craving a warm cup of broth to soothe my sore throat. Known to some as Jewish Penicillin, chicken soup has been widely known as the go-to meal for generations of cold and flu sufferers. However, my lack of wanting to eat chicken, combined with the medley of vegetables in my refrigerator that have decided to wilt in unison, inspired me to stir up a vegetable-based bouillon.

Chop. Pour. Simmer. Who knew three simple steps could release the most magical aroma into the air? 

Soon after, I sat on the couch, sipping the magical masterpiece with my roommate while discussing possible names for my most fantastic creation. His favorite part was the sweetness provided by the corn, whereas I thoroughly enjoyed the colourful combination. 

I suggested "Rainbow Soup." 
He said, "That's corny."
I laughed. Hard. 
Cream sauce, I have mastered thee.

After numerous failed attempts at concocting my own alfredo, I finally hit the milky jackpot. I quickly discovered that combining mushrooms, cream and wine will result in some tasty magic on my dinner plate. Simple, smooth and satisfying, this base will be my go-to for any white sauce I'll be craving in the near future. If you're not a fan of funghi, don't fret: substitute chopped spinach, onions or garlic in place of the mushrooms for an equally delicious variation.


Dear: Mother Nature,

I would like to formally thank you for the incredible tease that you laid upon our wonderful city this week. You showered us with mild temperatures, sunshine and the smell of dog crap spring in the air, and then proceeded, as you often do, to throw upon us a blanket of snow, slush and cold. What gets me through winter in times like these? Two things: The Nuit Blanche festival, and good food. 



As I prepared myself to spend a night prancing around in the snowy abyss that our city has become, I decided that the best way to begin would be by indulging in a little bit of comfort - food, that is. I'm not talking Kraft Dinner (that was Wednesday), and I'm not talking grilled cheese - I'm talking about something real, something with substance, and something that will keep me satisfied.

Enter Mushroom Toasts!
I now present to you my favourite appetizer of all time.

This stellar simple recipe combines four wonderful things: olive bread, mushrooms, thyme and goat cheese. Oh, and did I mention butter? You can omit the butter, if you're going the healthy route, but come on, this is comfort food we're talking about here! You want it to stick to your ribs and warm you from the inside, remember? Now that that's settled...
So... you know that feeling when you've got so much going on that it feels like you've got no time to think of cooking, let alone baking, but all you really want to do is eat cheesecake? Or maybe, you just generally want to eat cheesecake? In either case, I've got the solution for you! I present to you my super easy, five ingredient cheesecake. Though, technically, this is more pie than cake, as it's baked in a pie shell. In any case, it's delicious, and you should probably go ahead and drop whatever you're doing and make it. Now.



Easy As Cheese Pie
an original recipe by Allison Sklar

what you'll need
1.5 cups graham cracker crumbs
1 stick butter, melted
1 block light cream cheese (250g), at room temperature
2 eggs
1 can light sweetended condensed milk
topping: 1 can pie filling of your choice
note: to make this pie even EASIER, you may substitute a ready-to-bake deep dish graham crumb shell (available at most supermarkets in the baking section.)

how to do it
combine crumbs and butter. Press into 9'' deep dish pie plate.
combine cheese and sweetened condensed milk. Beat until fluffy. Add in eggs, beating well after each addition. Pour into pie shell. Bake at 310F for about 45 minutes or until set. Note: oven times and temperatures may vary. Let cool. Top with your choice of any of the following; canned pie-filling, jam, chocolate sauce, spiced nuts, whipped cream or fresh fruits. Keep refrigerated until ready to serve.
Readers, friends, fellow bloggers, Mom... I'd like you all to meet Swiss Chard. She's a lovely leafy green that tastes just like spinach, only slightly heartier, and possesses the most photogenic stems I've ever seen. I've shied away from Chard in the past, burdened with a fear of all that is unknown and green after an unfortunate mishap with raw rapini. To my sweet surprise, this chard did not leave the same bitter aftertaste on my tongue that do most greens. In fact, the striking similarity to spinach had me reaching for seconds. And possibly thirds... but who's counting?


What to cook the chard with? Whatever's on hand! When cooking with chard, don't be shy - use the stems as well as the leaves to add a pop of colour to your dish. Use it in your favourite recipes in place of spinach, or, go ahead and make this easy entrée tonight and change up your routine!